Truth Requires Thorns

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Midnight tales and dangerous magic.

The very minute I saw the cover and read the inside flap, I knew it was love.  I’ve been wanting to read a Leigh Bardugo book.  heck, I’ve owned Shadow and Bone for years but I have yet to break the binding.  Figuring that this would be a good way to get a feel of Bardugo’s writing style, I dove straight in.

Drawing heavily form mythology and folklore and fairy tales, Bardugo’s seven short stories are nothing if not gripping.  Whether the characters were tromping through thorny woods, dealing with witches, or singing deep under the sea, I felt as if I was right beside them.  Each story had a lesson woven into the fiber of each paragraph and it wasn’t preachy.  It was prickly and honest, and I hungered for more when each story drew to a close.

I was truly blown away.  The Language of Thorns anthology deserves more than five measly stars, but that will have to suffice, because Goodreads doesn’t let me rate higher than that.

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Down, Down in the Underground

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Holding promises of magic, music, and a fairy tale atmosphere, I knew that from the moment I saw S. Jae-Jones’s Wintersong it would be love.  For once, I didn’t wait eons to bring it home.  I stared at it, smelled the pages, and began consuming it.

Ever since she was a child, Liesl heard stories of the Goblin King.  Inspired by them, she began musical compositions.  But now she’s eighteen and stuck running the family inn, and so her musical dreams are slipping away.  then, in the blink of an eye, her sister is kidnapped by the man who has haunted her as long as she can remember.  Liesl has no choice but to rescue her sibling.

With the seductive darkness of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales and an aching beauty all of its own, Wintersong had me in tears and frustrated.  Not tears of frustration, but tears for a delectable spine-tingling agony.  S. Jae-Jones has spun an original masterpiece that delivered a dark fantasy wrapped romance dipped in mythology so alluring that even my cold heart swooned and shattered.  My review doesn’t do it justice.  The best way I can describe it is as beautiful ache.  Like (unrequited) love at its most painful.  I wanted to keep reading it over and over for the first time.

I bestow upon this first of a duet five out of five glimmering stars.